Translation and Inter-Cultural Research Cluster : Schools of Humanities, Social Sciences and Music : The University of Western Australia
 
 

Schools of Humanities, Social Sciences and Music

Translation and Inter-Cultural Research Cluster

Language

Here is a list of our steering committee members and research associates working on translation and inter-cultural studies.

Steering committee members

Steering committee members

Assistant Professor Dale Adams

Dale is Assistant Professor in German Studies at the School of Humanities. He attended secondary school and completed his first Masters degree in Germany and possesses native fluency in German and English. He has published in both German and English and his output includes a book with Röhrig University Publishing as well as a book chapter and refereed articles in the field of German Literature. He has also translated a book in the field of Environmental Economics as well as a number of scholarly articles from German to English.

Key Research and Supervision Areas

  • German and European Literature of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Comparative Literature
  • Literature, Science and Society
  • History and Philosophy of Mathematics and Science.
  • History and Philosophy of Probability

Ongoing Projects

Dale’s current research project combines the fields of German Literary Studies, the History of Science and the History of Ideas, by focusing on the reception of mathematical probability in German-language literature through the 19th and 20th centuries.

Selected Publications

  • Dale Adams: Die Konfrontation von Denken und Wirklichkeit: Die Rolle und Bedeutung der Mathematik bei Robert Musil, Hermann Broch und Friedrich Dürrenmatt. Transpositions: Australian Studies in German Literature, Philosophy and Culture. Vol.2. Ed. Franz-Josef Deiters, Alison Lewis, Yixu Lü, Peter Morgan. St. Ingbert: Röhrig, 2011.  [Translation: The Confrontation of Thought and Reality: The Role and Significance of Mathematics in the works of Robert Musil, Hermann Broch and Friedrich Dürrenmatt.]
  • “Nicht immer auf Seiten der Wahrheit: Wahrscheinlichkeit und (Un)Wissen in Kleists ‘Unwahrscheinliche Wahrhaftigkeiten’”. Wissensfiguren im Werk Heinrich von Kleists. Ed. Yixu Lü, Anthony Stephens, Alison Lewis, Wilhelm Voßkamp. Freiburg: Rombach, 2012: p. 207–222. [Translation: “Not always on the side of the truth: Probability and Ignorance/Knowledge in Kleist’s ‘Improbable Veracities’.”]
  • “Wirksame Zufälle: Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie als Erkenntnis- und Erzähltheorie in Novalis’ ‘Heinrich von Ofterdingen’.” Die Aktualität der Romantik / The Actuality of Romanticism. Limbus – Australisches Jahrbuch für germanistische Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft / Australian Yearbook of German Literary and Cultural Studies. Vol. 5. Ed. Franz-Josef Deiters, Axel Fliethmann, Birgit Lang, Alison Lewis, Christiane Weller. Freiburg i.Br./Berlin/Vienna: Rombach, 2012. [Translation: “Effective coincidences: The Theory of Probability as a Theory of Knowledge and Narration in Novalis’ ‘Heinrich von Ofterdingen’”]

Selected Translation Work

  • Malte Faber/Reiner Manstetten: Philosophical Basics of Ecology and Economy. Translated from the German by Dale Adams. London/New York: Routledge, 2009. [Original: Malte Faber/Reiner Manstetten: Mensch - Natur - Wissen. Grundlagen der Umweltbildung. Göttingen: Vandenhoek & Ruprecht 2003.]
  • Niels Werber: “The Disappearance of Literature. Friedrich Kittler’s Path to Media Theory.” Thesis Eleven 107 (2011): p. 47-52
  • Erhard Schüttpelz: “Body Techniques and the Nature of the Body: Re-reading Marcel Mauss.” Nach der Natur / After Nature. Limbus – Australisches Jahrbuch für germanistische Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft Vol. 3. Ed. Franz-Josef Deiters, Axel Fliethmann, Birgit Lang, Alison Lewis, Christiane Weller. Freiburg i.Br./Berlin/Vienna: Rombach, 2010: p. 177–194.

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Eva Chye

Ms Eva Chye

 

 

 

 

 

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Romit Dasgupta

Assistant Professor Romit Dasgupta

Romit is Assistant Professor in the Discipline of Asian Studies. He coordinates and teaches upper-level units in Japanese Studies and Popular Culture in Contemporary Asia, a joint Anthropology-Asian Studies unit. His area of research includes articulations of gender in Japan and Asia, popular and visual culture in Japan and Asia, and “in-between” identities. He was the Chief Investigator on the UWA side for a joint inaugural University of Queensland-UWA Bilateral Research Collaboration Award funded project on shifts in articulations of “family” in Japan in 2011.The project involved Japanese Studies staff and postgraduates from both institutions, and the collected papers will be published as a co-edited volume, Configurations of Family in Contemporary Japan (Routledge, forthcoming 2014).

Key research and supervision areas

  • Comparative gender studies (Japan and Asia)
  • Comparative cultural and areas studies (Japan, Australia, Turkey)
  • Cross-cultural identities

Selected publications

  • (2005) McLelland, Mark and Dasgupta, Romit (Eds.) Genders, Transgenders and Sexualities in Modern Japan (London, Routledge: 2005).
  • (2006) “The Film Bishônen and Queer (N)Asia Through Japanese Popular Culture”, in Matt Allen and Rumi Sakamoto (Eds.) Popular Culture, Globalisation and Japan (London, Routledge: 2006). 56 - 74.
  • (2009) ‘The Lost Decade’ of the 1990s and Shifting Masculinities in Japan”, Culture, Society & Masculinity, Volume 1, Number 1, 2009, pp. 79- 95
  • (2009) “The Queer Family in Asia”, Inter-Asia Roundtable: Gender Relations in the 21st Century Asian Family”, 17-18 August 2009, Asia Research Institute (ARI), National University of Singapore, ARI Working Paper Series
  • (2009) “From ‘Japan Inc.’ to ‘Japan Cool’: Shifting Contours of Japanese Studies from the 1970s into the 2000s’, in David Black and Sachiko Sone (Eds.) An Enduring Friendship – Western Australia and Japan: Past, Present and Future (Crawley, Westerley Centre, UWA: 2009). 211-213
  • (2010) “Globalization and the Bodily Performance of ‘Cool’ and ‘Uncool’ Masculinities in Corporate Japan”, Intersections: Gender and Sexuality in Asia and the Pacific Issue 23 (Special Issue: “Performing Globalisation: Asia-Pacific Perspectives”), January 2010.

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Paul Gibbard

Assistant Professor Paul Gibbard

Paul Gibbard has worked as a translator for the 'Baudin Legacy' project, for which he translated the journal of the French botanist Théodore Leschenault. His other research interests include: Voltaire, Rousseau, eighteenth-century women's writing, the nineteenth-century French novel, and links between literature and political thought. He has taught translation studies and French language, literature and culture at several different universities.

Key research and supervision areas

  • Literary translation (French English)

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Hélène Jaccomard

Professor Hélène Jaccomard

A professor of French Studies at the University of Western Australia, Hélène has been engaged on and off in the field of translation. Outside of business translations she has published literature in translation and research papers on practical and theoretical issues pertaining to literary translation. Hélène is a NAATI accredited translator.

Key research and supervision areas

Specialized translation (literary; business and financial)

Ongoing projects

Hélène is working on two projects at the moment: representations of Muslims and Islam in French literature, and Violence in French comedies.

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John Kinder

Professor John Kinder

John is Convenor of Italian Studies at School of Humanities. John has published on Italian language, migration and cross-national identities in internationally refereed journals and top academic presses including Cambridge University Press. John is Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and Fellow of the Associazione per la Storia della Lingua Italiana. John is currently working on two major research projects on multilingualism in Italy supported by the Australian Research Council ("Enduring diversity: a history of multilingualism in Italy") and early Italian migrants in Australia with international research collaborators in Europe.

Key research and supervision areas

  • Multilingualism in Europe and Australia
  • Migration and language variations
  • Cross-national identity
  • Contrastive linguistics (Italian and English)
  • Specialized translation (religious; drama)
  • Historical translation in Italy

Ongoing projects

John is working on two major projects. One, supported by the ARC, is entitled "Enduring diversity: a history of multilingualism in Italy". The aim of the project is to use the findings of the sociology of language to compile a picture of language choice and language mixing throughout Italy. While traditional studies of the major European languages take the emergence of the national language as the logical focus of language history, this project will complement such studies by studying the diversity of language usage which endured over two millennia even while a national language was being developed. The resulting volume will pose a number of questions for further research into language history. The other is a study of correspondence written by Italian residents in Western Australia during the century before mass migration, 1850-1950. Professor Michele Colombo of the Università Cattolica of Milan is collaborating on this project.

Selected publications

  • Using Italian: a Guide to Contemporary Usage (with Vincenzo M Savini), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2004
  • CLIC: Culture and Language on Italy on Cd-rom/Cultura e Lingua d’Italia in Cd-rom. Novara: Interlinea. 2008.
  • “Language as expression of unity and diversity: from Babel to Pentecost and beyond”, Australian eJournal of Theology, 12 (2008)
  • ‘Language and identities: the exceptional normality of Italy’, Portal: Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies. 5, 2 (2008) http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/ojs/index.php/portal/issue/view/35
  • “Italian as a language of communication in nineteenth century Italy and abroad” (with Michele Colombo), Italica, 89, 1 (2012), pp. 109-121
  • “Raffaele Martelli, da Ancona all’Australia Occidentale: due metà di una vita”, in Marco Severini (ed.), Viaggi e viaggiatori nell’Ottocento, Venezia, Marsilio, 2013, pp. 353-366. 

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Philip Mead

Winthrop Professor Philip Mead

Philip is Winthrop Professor and inaugural Chair of Australian Literature. Philip has received and led nationally competitive research and teaching grants including the ALTC funded project, ‘Australian Literature Teaching Survey’ (2009) and the ARC Discovery Project grant for 2010-2012, ‘Monumental Shakespeare: an investigation of transcultural commemoration in 20th-century Australia and England' with Gordon McMullan (King's College London). He is on the board of management of the ARC LIEF funded AustLIt consortium. In 2009-2010 Philip was Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack Visiting Chair of Interdisciplinary Australian Studies at the Free University, Berlin.

In 2009 his book Networked Language: History & Culture in Australian Poetry was shortlisted for the Association for Australian Literature’s Walter McRae Russell Award, and in 2010 it won the New South Wales Premier’s Prize for Literary Scholarship. In 2013 Philip is a member of the judging panel for the Prime Minister's Literary Awards.

Key research and supervision areas

  • Postcolonial literature
  • Literary translation and poetry
  • Translation and cross-cultural reception of Australian literature (for example, China, Macao)
  • Transnational poetics
  • Digital humanities
  • Literary education and assessment

Ongoing projects

Philip's current research includes a study of Australian literature and the extractive industries, Shakespeare memorialization, an introductory literary history of Tasmania, and the intellectual biography of Ross Chambers. 

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Tomoko Nakamatsu

Assistant Professor Tomoko Nakamatsu

Tomoko teaches Japanese language and cultural studies at UWA. She holds a Ph.D. in Asian Studies from Murdoch University. She is currently looking at the language and family relations in intermarriages among Japanese migrants in Australia.

Key research and supervision areas

  • Migration and cross-national identities
  • Gender Studies
  • Contrastive language studies (Japanese/English)
  • Cross-national family and marriage

Selected publications

  • Nakamatsu, T. 2013, Marriage Migration: Love in Brokered Marriages in Contemporary Japan, In Proletarian and Gendered Mass Migrations: A Global Perspective on Continuities and Discontinuities from the 19th to the 21st Centuries, eds. Dirk Hoerder and Amarjit Kaur, Brill, pp.467-483.
  • Nakamatsu, T. (Forthcoming) Under the Multicultural Flag: Japan’s Ambiguous Multicultural Framework and its Local Evaluations and Practices, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.
  • T. Coveney, K. Boston, M. Takayashi and T. Nakamatsu, 2011, Living Japanese: A Practical Course, Book 2, Kuroshio Shuppan, Tokyo.

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Shalmalee Palekar

Assistant Professor Shalmalee Palekar

Shalmalee Palekar has previously taught at Xavier’s College and Sophia College of the University of Mumbai (formerly Bombay), Macquarie University, and the University of New South Wales. She has won University and national awards for excellence in teaching, in Australia and India. Her research areas are Queer postcolonial and transcultural literary and cultural theories and practices; South Asian writing in English and in translation; Translation theories and practices (especially regarding poetry); and Indian Cinemas.

Her current research project is titled “Queer India before and after 2009: intersections of sexuality, nation and public culture in literature and cinema”. She is a member of the Indian Ocean and South Asia Research Network (IOSARN), and has a substantial and cited publication track record of peer-reviewed book chapters and journal articles. Shalmalee has a book of poetry in press and is also a translator of Marathi poetry, a screenplay consultant, and performs to international critical acclaim with three women and a cello, collectively called Funkier than Alice.

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Marie-Eve Ritz

Professor Marie-Eve Ritz

Marie-Eve is Chair of Linguistics at the University of Western Australia. Her research focuses on the semantics and pragmatics of tense and aspect and semantic change. Recent research projects have included (i) a study of innovating uses of the present perfect in Australian English, uses that had not been documented or analyzed before and which shed light on the semantic instability of this linguistic category; (ii) a formal study of the temporal and aspectual systems of several Australian Aboriginal languages, systems that had not previously been analyzed in any great depth. The former project involved collaboration with a colleague in the UK, and the latter colleagues from Europe (France, Belgium, UK) and Australia (Melbourne). Both projects have been funded through internal and external grants, including a European Union FP7 grant still current.

Marie-Eve Ritz has published in top international linguistics journals and volumes. She has supervised to completion a large number of Masters and PhD research students on a range of topics and languages, for example translation of temporal expression between Vietnamese, a tenseless language, and English; acquisition of tense and aspect (Thai, Japanese); politeness and cross-cultural pragmatic phenomena (Japanese/English) and various other projects in applied and theoretical linguistics.

Key research and supervision areas

  • Semantics and pragmatics
  • Language change; historical semantics/pragmatics
  • Tense and Aspect
  • Contrastive linguistics (tense & aspect; pragmatics)
  • French, (Australian) English, a set of Australian Indigenous languages (Martuthunira, Panyjima, Jaminjung, Kala Law Yaga)

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Celeste Rodriguez Louro

Assistant Professor Celeste Rodriguez Louro

Dr Rodríguez Louro is A NAATI-accredited English-Spanish translator since 2009. She is specialized in language variation and change in English and Spanish. She is interested in the linguistic and social factors shaping language usage and in how this usage ultimately contributes to language evolution. She has been invited to contribute her innovative research to international volumes, has presented her work at more than 30 peer-reviewed conferences, and has been invited to present her research to audiences in Argentina, Austria, Australia, Canada, France, Spain and the USA.

Dr Rodríguez Louro has a strong record of international collaborations and has led several panels and workshops on language variation and change. Dr Rodríguez Louro has acted as reviewer to several world-renowned journals and publishing houses, has developed a strong record of media appearances, and is committed to foregrounding to the general public the importance of understanding language in society.

Key research areas

  • Language variation and change
  • Language in culture and society
  • Discourse and pragmatics
  • Multilingualism
  • Cross-cultural issues in translation and interpreting

Key publications

  • Colantoni, Laura & Celeste Rodríguez Louro (Eds). (Forthcoming). Perspectivas teóricas y experimentales sobre el español de la Argentina [Theoretical and experimental perspectives on Argentinian Spanish]. Madrid: Iberoamericana/Vervuert.
    Rodríguez Louro, Celeste & Thomas Harris. (Forthcoming). Evolution with an attitude: The grammaticalization of epistemic/evidential verbs in Australian English. English Language and Linguistics 17:3.
  • Howe, Chad & Celeste Rodríguez Louro. (2013). Variation at the periphery: Continuative meaning and the Spanish perfect. In Ana M. Carvalho & Sara Beaudrie (eds.), Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Spanish Sociolinguistics. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project. 41–52. http://www.lingref.com/cpp/wss/6/paper2855.pdf
  • Rodríguez Louro, Celeste. (2013). Quotatives Down Under: Be like in cross-generational Australian English speech. English World-Wide. 34 (1): 48–76.

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Winthrop Professor Krishna Sen

Winthrop Professor Krishna Sen

Winthrop Professor Krishna Sen, an internationally recognized scholar of contemporary Indonesian and media studies commenced her appointment as Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Western Australia in January 2009. She has held teaching and research positions at Murdoch and Curtin Universities, and was the Executive Director for Humanities and Creative Arts at the Australian Research Council in Canberra, just prior to taking up her position at UWA. Krishna is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities (FAHA), a Member of the Hawke Research Institute Advisory Board, and President and Chair of the Australasian Council of Deans of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (DASSH). She serves on the editorial boards of several national and international journals.

Key research and supervision areas

  • Comparative language and cultural studies (Indonesia, Australia and India)
  • Cross-national multi-media studies
  • Globalization and multicultural identity (with a focus on Southeast Asia and Australia)
  • Gender studies

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Gary Sigley

Professor Gary Sigley

Gary is Professor of Chinese and Asian Studies at the University of Western Australia. A authoritative and pioneering scholar of Chinese government (governmentality studies) and the politics of cultural heritage, Gary has conducted extensive fieldwork in China, especially in the southwest region of Yunnan Province; and has published extensively in internationally peer refereed journals (in both English and Chinese) and in book collections edited by leading scholars. A central theme of Gary’s interdisciplinary research on China is the important role that ‘culture’ plays in China’s social and political life, for example, in the ‘reinvention’ of cultural practice in relation to tea consumption.

Gary has secured competitive national and international research grants that promote Chinese language and cultural studies such as a Worldwide University Network Grant, an Australia-China Council Grant and an Australian Prime Minister’s Endeavour Fellowship. He has supervised to completion numerous postgraduate students working on Chinese social, cultural and political transformation. Gary was the Founding Director of UWA’s Confucius Institute (2005-2009), the first to be established in Australia. Under his direction the CI at UWA was recognised as an ‘Advanced Confucius Institute’ and he was personally awarded an ‘Outstanding Contribution’ prize in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People. In addition to Chinese Mandarin Gary also has a working knowledge of Cantonese, Shanghainese and Yunnanese. Gary is also an Advisor to the UNESCO Observatory RLCCE (Research in Local Cultures and Creativity in Education) (The Hong Kong Institute of Education).

Key research and supervision areas

  • Chinese language and cultural studies
  • Language in culture and society
  • Chinese cultural heritage conservation
  • China governmentality studies
  • Critical comparative cultural studies (China and Australia)
  • Specialized translation (Mandarin-English: tourism and religion)

Ongoing projects

  • The Ancient Tea Horse Road and the Politics of Cultural Heritage in Contemporary China (in collaboration with the Ancient Tea Horse Road Culture Research Institute at Yunnan University)
  • The Donkey Friends: The Emergence of Outdoor Tourism and Leisure in Contemporary China (in collaboration with scholars in Australia and China)
  • Chinese Governmentalities Project (in collaboration with scholars in Australia and the United States)
  • China’s Frontiers Project (in collaboration with the China Research Group at Griffith University)

Websites

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Dr Xianling Song

Xianlin Song is an Associate Professor in the Department of Asian Studies, and Director of Confucius Institute. She teaches in the areas of Chinese language and cultural studies. Her research focuses on Chinese feminist studies, transcultural studies and global education.

Translations

  • Getting It Right: Marriage, Sex and Pleasure, translated with Gary Sigley (ed.) from Chinese to English, (ME Sharp, Fall/winter 1998).
    ‘Zhiqing Poems’, translated with Gary Sigley from Chinese to English (Renditions, No.50, 1998), pp. 134-139.
  • ‘My Life as a Migrant Worker’, translated with Tamara Jacka in On the Move: Women and Rural-to-Urban Migration in Contemporary China, Arianne M. Gaetano and Tamara Jacka (eds.), Columbia University Press, 2004.

Publications

  • 2014 Schaffer, Kay and Xianlin Song, Women Writing in Postsocialist China. London and New York: Routledge (2014).
  • 2012 Song, Xianlin and Kate Cadman (eds). Bridging Transcultural Divides: Teaching Asian Languages and Cultures in a Globalising Academy. Adelaide: University of Adelaide Press.
  • 2014 ‘Reconceptualising the ‘Other’ in Australian Universities’ with Greg McCarthy, Intercultural Masquerade: New Orientalism, New Occidentalism, Old Exoticism, Regis Machart, Fred Dervin & Minghui Gao (eds.). Springer (in press).
  • 2014 ‘Changing Social Relations in Higher Education: the First Year International Student and the “Chinese Learner” in Australia,’ in Universities in Transition: Foregrounding Social Contexts of Knowledge in the First Year Experience, Heather Brook, Deane Fergie, Mick Maeorg, & Dee Michell (eds.), Adelaide: University of Adelaide Press (2014), pp. 127-156.
  • 2012 ‘Education with(out) Distinction: Beyond Graduate Attributes for Chinese International  Students’ with Kate Cadman, Another pedagogy is possible: Bridging transcultural divides in teaching Asian studies and languages, Song & Cadman (eds.). Adelaide: University of Adelaide Press , pp. 270-286.
  • 2012 ‘Another pedagogy is possible: an epistemological Perspective’ with Kate Cadman,  Another pedagogy is possible: Bridging transcultural divides  in teaching Asian studies and languages, Song & Cadman (eds.). Adelaide: University of Adelaide Press (2012), pp. 3-26.
  • 2003 ‘Reconstructing the Confucian Ideal in 1980s China: The Culture Craze and New Confucianism’, in What Is New Confucianism? John Makeham (ed.), New York: Palgrave (2003), pp. 81-104.
  • 2015 ‘Australian Governments’ policy conundrum: ambivalence on China and certainty on Japan’, with Greg McCarthy, Social Identities (in press).
  • 2015 ‘Challenges of Global Mobility: “Critical Thinking” and Pedagogical Implications for Higher Education’, East Asia: an International Quarterly (in press).
  • 2013  ‘Education with(out) Distinction: Beyond Graduate Attributes for Chinese International  Students,’  with Kate Cadman,  Higher Education Research & Development (Vol. 32, No. 2), pp.258-271.
  • 2010 ‘Re-gendering Chinese History: Zhao Mei’s Emperor Wu Zetian’ East Asia: an International Quarterly (Durham, UK) (December, Vol.27, No. 4), pp.361-370.
  • 2007 Unruly Spaces: Gender, Women’s Writing and Indigenous Feminism in China,’ with Kay Schaffer,  Journal of Gender Studies (Vol.16, No.1, March), pp.17-30.
  • 2006 ‘Narrative, Trauma and Memory: Chen Ran’s A Private Life, Tiananmen Square and Female     Embodiment’, with Kay Schaffer, Asian Studies Review (Vol.30, June), pp.161-173.
  • 2006 ‘Writing Beyond the Wall: Translation, Cross-Cultural Exchange and Chen Ran’s A Private Life?’ with Kay Schaffer,  Portal: Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies (Vol. 3, no.2, July), at http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/ojs/index.php/portal.
  • 2005 ‘Signs of the Times: the Discourse of ‘Three Represents’, East Asia: an International Quarterly (Durham, UK) (Fall, Vol.22, No. 3), pp. 25-40.
  • 2002 ‘Signs of the Times: Commercial Neologisms in China’, Semiotica: Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies. (Vol.141/1-4), pp. 145-158.
  • 2000 ‘Middle Kingdom Mentalities: Chinese Visions of National Characteristics in the 1990s,’ with Gary Sigley, Communal/Plural (Volume 8, number 1), 47-64.
  • 2000 ‘Post-Mao New Poetry and ‘Occidentalism’’, East Asia: An International Quarterly (Vol.18,No.1, Spring), pp. 82-109.
  • 1999 ‘Post-Mao New Poetry in the Light of Deconstruction’, Social Semiotics (Vol.9, No.1, ),pp. 107-122.

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Ms Susan Takao



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Research associates

Assistant Professor Wei Liu

Wei Liu is an assistant professor at the School of Computer Science and Software Engineering. She has a (2003) PhD in Information Systems from the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Key research and teaching areas

  • Corpus/computational linguistics
  • Semi-automatic ontology engineering
  • Large-scale language corpora 
  • Specialised corpora construction from the web

Research grants

  • (2009) UWA Research Development Award Extracting Social Networks from Collaborative E-Portals
  • (2005) Bootstrapping Semantic Web in Australia 
  • (2006) Vocabulary Extension for Autonomous Robots via Semantic Web Services
  • (2002-2004) ARC Linkage Grant on Flexible and Robust Protocol-Based Interaction between Agents in Open Systems

Selected publications

  • W. Wong, L. Padgham, J. Thangarajah and W. Liu. Coordinating Protocol Interleaving for Coherent Conversations, The 1st International Workshop on Engineering Multi-Agent Systems, Minnesota, USA, May 2013
  • W. Wong, W. Liuy and M. Bennamoun. Ontology Learning from Text: A Look back and into the Future. ACM Computing Surveys, A_ Ranked
  • W. Liu and W. Wong. (2009) Web Service Clustering using Text Mining Techniques, in International Journal of Agent-Oriented Software Engineering (JAOSE), Vol. 3, No. 1, Pages 6-26. B Ranked
  • W. Wong, W. Liuy and M. Bennamoun. (2007) Tree-Traversing Ant Algorithm for term clustering based on featureless similarities, in Journal of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery,
  • Volume 15, Issue 3, Pages 349-381 (Corresponding Author) A Ranked, Google Citation (23), Journal Impact Factor (2.421, the highest in the area of data analysis)
  • W. Liu, A. Weichselbraun, A. Scharl, and E. Chang. (2005) Semi-Automatic Ontology Extension Using Spreading Activation, Journal of Universal Knowledge Management, No.1, p50-58, 2005 Google Citations (62).

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Mr Andrew Endrey

Andrew is a UWA research associate specialising in Chinese and English.

Key research and teaching areas

  • Specialised translation (Chinese-English) 
  • Contrastive lexicography (Chinese-English) 
  • Immigration and cross-cultural studies

Publications

  • Andrew Endrey (translated) (2007) “Zhiliang: Hungry Mountain Village: excerpts”, Renditions, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 68:112-143
  • Andrew Endrey (translated with introduction) (2006) “Zhang Xiaoshan: Fragments of Recollection: excerpts”, Renditions, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 65:16-37
  • Andrew Endrey (translated) (2006) “Generating Income: The Reeducation of an English Professor” in Geremie Barme edited, with Miriam Lang: Sang Ye China Candid – The People on the People’s Republic, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 235-243 
  • Andrew Endrey (2000)  (principal drafter as Principal Research Officer, Department of the Senate) Humanity Diminished: The Crime of Genocide, Report of the Inquiry into the Anti-Genocide Bill 1999, Senate Legal and Constitutional References Committee, The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra 
  • Lin–nei Li (ed.) William Geddes, Leong Ko, Andrew Endrey (1993), English-Chinese Dictionary of New Economic Terms Used in Contemporary China, Deakin University, Hong Kong 
  • Andrew Endrey   (1993) “Australian immigration policy and the Chinese in Australia” in Gordon Forth (ed.) Contemporary Australian Society, Deakin University-Nanjing University Press, Nanjing, pp. 45-62
  • Andrew Endrey (1991) “Developments in International Refugee Law and Conventions”, consultant’s report for The National Population Council’s Refugee Review July 1991, National Population Council, Canberra 
  • Andrew Endrey (1991) “Outline of Australia’s response to refugee situations since 1975”, Department of Immigration, Local Government and Ethnic Affairs, Canberra
  • Patty Yang, Helen Cheung and Andrew Endrey (1987) Glossary of Departmental Terms, Department of Immigration, Local Government and Ethnic Affairs, Canberra 
  • Andrew Endrey (1981) Hu Feng: Return of the Counter-Revolutionary”, Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs, The Australian National University, Contemporary China Centre, Canberra, 5:73-90 

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Professor Roberto Togneri

Prof Roberto Togneri (M’89-SM’04) received the B.E. degree in 1985, and the Ph.D degree in 1989 both from the University of Western Australia. He joined the School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering at The University of Western Australia in 1988, where he is now currently a Professor.

Prof Togneri is a member of the Signals and Systems Engineering Research Group and heads the Signal and Information Processing Lab. His research activities include signal processing and robust feature extraction of speech signals, statistical and neural network models for speech and speaker recognition, audio-visual recognition and biometrics, and related aspects of communications, information retrieval, and pattern recognition. He has published over 100 refereed journal and conference papers in the areas of signals and information systems, was co-author of the book "Fundamentals of Information Theory and Coding Design", Chapman & Hall/CRC, 2003 and is the chief investigator on two Australian Research Council Discovery Project research grants from 2010 to 2013. He is also a member on the Executive of the Australasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA).

Key research and teaching areas

  • Computational linguistics
  • Speech science and technology 
  • Natural language processing 

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